Books & the Arts

Claudio Lomnitz and the Vertigo of Translation

In his generations-spanning new book, the anthropologist tracks the story of Jewish life in Latin America through the travails of one family. 

Ilan Stavans

China Between Communism and Capitalism

The history of the country’s relationship with the market is filled with conflicting narratives. 

Andrew B. Liu

Stephen Crane’s Lifetime of Mystery

His visceral fiction and journalism might be best understood as a literature of pure immediacy.

Paul Franz

From the Magazine

The Haunted World of Edith Wharton

The Haunted World of Edith Wharton

Whether exploring the dread of everyday life or the horrors of the occult, her ghost tales documented an America haunted by the specters of isolation, class, and despair. 

Krithika Varagur
Has the Pandemic Pushed Universities to the Brink?

Has the Pandemic Pushed Universities to the Brink?

Covid has turned the gap between universities and colleges serving mainly privileged students and those serving needy ones into a chasm and it is unclear if the latter will be able to survive.

Andrew Delbanco
Is “The Matrix Resurrections” About Authorial Anxiety?

Is “The Matrix Resurrections” About Authorial Anxiety?

At times myopic and contrarian, the latest entry in the series feels more like a copyright renewal than a narrative.

Stephen Kearse

Literary Criticism

Sally Rooney’s Fiction for End Times

Sally Rooney’s Fiction for End Times

In her third novel, Rooney does more than just respond to critics; she surveys the wreckage of modern life.

Tony Tulathimutte
The Black Arts Movement’s Revolution in the South

The Black Arts Movement’s Revolution in the South

A new book offers a sweeping history of the radical art and institutions created in the South by the Black Arts Movement.

Elias Rodriques
Maggie Nelson and the Evolving Politics of Liberation

Maggie Nelson and the Evolving Politics of Liberation

In her new book, Nelson examines the politics of freedom on the left and the right.

Jennifer Wilson

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History & Politics

John Rawls and Liberalism’s Selective Conscience

John Rawls and Liberalism’s Selective Conscience

With its doctrine of fairness, A Theory of Justice transformed political philosophy. But what did it leave out? 

Olúfémi O. Táíwò
What Is the Relationship Between Democracy and Authoritarianism?

What Is the Relationship Between Democracy and Authoritarianism?

The Age of Revolution inaugurate a new era in modern history defined not only by new democratic institutions but also by despots and charismatic leaders.

Tyler Stovall
The Anti-Intellectual Intellectuals of the Conservative Movement

The Anti-Intellectual Intellectuals of the Conservative Movement

Why is Mark Levin’s American Marxism so popular?

Michael Kazin

Fiction

Francisco Goldman’s Altered States

Francisco Goldman’s Altered States

In his new novel, Goldman asks readers to question the very essence of how we define ourselves. 
Ed Morales

Throughout his fiction and nonfiction, Francisco Goldman has mapped the many border lines that pervade his life. Some of his novels have mined his Central American family connections. His journalistic work has uncovered the genocidal policies of the US government and its Guatemalan government collaborators. Sometimes he has adopted the… Continue Reading >

Ad Policy

Television and Films

Joanna Hogg and the Art of Life

Joanna Hogg and the Art of Life

Her remarkable two-part film The Souvenir examines how an artist turns the fragments of their personal history into an enduring story.

Devika Girish
What’s New in the New “West Side Story”?

What’s New in the New “West Side Story”?

In Steven Spielberg’s version, we get a film that offers a far more inclusive vision of postwar America but one that still retains its flawed view of working-class tribalism.

Ed Morales
The Ardor of “Licorice Pizza”

The Ardor of “Licorice Pizza”

Paul Thomas Anderson’s latest film is his most personal work yet.

Vikram Murthi

Politics

The Fuller Court.

Whose Side Is the Supreme Court On?

Many people who came of age in the 1950s and 60s view the Supreme Court as a force for good when it comes to race. But the court has often been the most anti-progressive branch of the federal government.
Randall Kennedy

Many people who came of age between, say, 1940 and 1970 have become accustomed to seeing the Supreme Court as a force for good when it comes to race. They have developed a faith in the justices’ claim, voiced in 1940 in a decision overturning the convictions of Black defendants… Continue Reading >

Poems

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